Logout Login | Contact Us
 

Is Right to Work Coming to Oregon?

The Salem Statesman Journal is setting the record straight on efforts to bring Right- to- Work legislation to the state of Oregon.

Oregon is one of three states targeted for Right -to- Work laws this year. Other efforts are underway in Missouri and Ohio. Supporters of Right-to-Work are using their energy to get legislation on ballot initiatives for voters to decide in 2014. The latest Right-to-Work push appeals on slick marketing boasting legislation will be good for local economies. Multi-million dollar campaigns are being sponsored by “deep pocketed” donors, corporations and the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) that have collaborated (secretly) on enacting legislation in statehouses.

For Oregon, the Salem Statesman Journal sees through the deception and warns Right-to-Work would be disastrous for the state. In its editorial, the publication says:

Under right-to-work laws, employees in unionized workplaces no longer can be required to pay unions for the cost of being represented. That’s the sum and substance of right to work, in one sentence.

These laws, passed in 24 states, have nothing to do with protecting those who have a job from losing it or granting anyone who needs a job the right to find it. Yet the phrase persists, because political factions that back such legislation aren’t courageous or honest enough to call them what they are.
Right-to-work is a misnomer. If proponents were straight with us, they’d call these transparently vindictive efforts a “Right to Weaken Unions Act” or a “Right to Punish Those Who Oppose Us Measure.” The laws drain money from unions under the guise of creating a more business-friendly environment for states."

There are 24 states with Right- to- Work laws that prohibit making union fees a condition of employment.  Statistics show the average worker in states with Right-to-Work laws makes less income compared to workers in other states.  In addition, in states with Right -to-Work laws, 26.7 percent of jobs are in low-wage occupations, compared with 19.5 percent of jobs in other states.

Comments are closed

© 2015 - IAFF